Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

Pavement Marking

In a report developed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), it was recommended that the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) establish plans to “better manage” initiatives and efforts related to Connected Automated Vehicles (CAVs). GAO officials state within the report, which was released in November 2017, that their reasoning behind the research efforts are based on the potential promise of CAVs to provide transformative safety and mobility benefits, but these benefits also will come with a set of safety and infrastructure challenges for policymakers.

 

While it also was noted that other components such as urban versus rural settings and local ownership of roadways will play a hand in infrastructure adaptations, many experts in automation and infrastructure back up the report’s claims, and assert that consistent and proper maintenance of the current roadway system is of the upmost importance for conventional and AV motorists—especially when it comes to pavement markings.

 

ATSSA has a dedicated group of members on its Pavement Marking Committee (member login required), who are working to assert the proper maintenance of pavement marking and advance technologies being developed to help increase safety benefits and accommodation of CAVs. The committee has developed a list of policies and continues to work toward advancing the collaboration between the roadway safety industry and automakers as America progresses toward an automated future.

Resources

Sensor technology in roadway infrastructure

How devices are strengthening the lines of communication between human and automated drivers 

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For many departments of transportation (DOTs), the collection and sending of real-time traffic data to roadway users is high priority. One way agencies nationwide are achieving this goal is through the use of sensor technology in roadway infrastructure, such as pavement markings or signs, allowing them to strengthen Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) communication. 

The use of wider longitudinal pavement markings

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Over the past two decades, as researchers have gained more knowledge about driver visibility needs and aging driver population trends, some transportation agencies have begun to use longitudinal pavement markings that are wider than the 4-inch minimum for standard centerline, edge line, or lane line applications. This report describes a project with two primary activities. The first activity was identifying the current use of wider markings among transportation agencies in the United States, Canada, and other countries. The second activity was a review of the technical literature related to wider markings, with a particular emphasis on
previous studies of the costs and benefits of using wider markings. This research report summarizes the significant findings from the project.

ATSSA’s Roadway Safety Program: economic impact of $3.0 billion annual safety initiative

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ATSSA members work on the front lines of traffic safety. They make roads safer by installing modern roadway safety devices and protecting workers during the road construction process. ATSSA members also work to reduce the number and severity of roadway crashes. According to federal statistics, each year motor vehicle crashes claim 42,000 lives and injure 3,000,000 people, incurring $230.6 billion in societal costs and $21 billion in direct taxpayer costs. The International Union of Police Associations says that more police officers die in motor vehicle crashes every year than by criminals’ bullets. According to AASHTO’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan, unless there is a change in crash rates, six out of 10 children born today will be injured in motor vehicle crashes during their lifetime, and one in 84 will die violently on roadways. 

ATSSA's Roadway Safety Program

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Approximately 3,500 people die every month on our nation’s roadways. The increased tax burden from these crashes for taxpayers is nearly $14 billion with societal costs well over $150 billion. ATSSA’s proposal to invest $3 billion a year to enhance the nation’s roadway safety infrastructure is a sound investment that will pay for itself in reduced crashes. In addition, the funding mechanisms put in place to fund the Roadway Safety Program would provide much needed additional revenue to enhance the capacity of our nation’s transportation system. We look forward to taking these proposals to Congress and the American people to get their support for improving our roadway safetysystem and making “Safer Roads - Save Lives” a reality.

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