ATSSA Blog

MASH to become 'performance specification'

AASHTO endorses motion to provide criteria for product owners to test and certify traffic safety devices

Erica Terrini 0 1316 Article rating: 5.0

At its meeting of October 9 in St. Louis, Missouri, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials’ (AASHTO) Board of Directors endorsed a motion put forth by the Council of Highways and Streets (Chief Engineers) to develop the Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) into a “performance specification.” 

Keeping roadways safe: DOTs highlight countermeasures designed to reduce traffic fatalities

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Every roadway countermeasure makes a difference. Roundabouts, highly reflective signs, pavement markings and all traffic control and infrastructure devices are critical to enhancing safety on U.S. roadways. Countermeasures can mitigate against human behavior-related crashes and ultimately save lives.  

ATSSA flagger training: The importance of being certified

How knowing the standards helps the ‘first line of defense’ protect all roadway workers

Erica Terrini 0 1177 Article rating: 5.0

ATSSA's flagger training courses have been teaching individuals how to be safe and effective flaggers for nearly 50 years. These courses help trainees understand why proper flagger operations are essential, identify standard flagger control references, and learn standard flagger practices for many situations—both expected and unexpected.
While the association has taken great strides to provide and adequately train individuals across the country, there still are infrequencies when it comes to having consistent standards on a national scale.

Will Connected and Autonomous Vehicles change the landscape of signage standardization?

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On June 19, 2019 at the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (NCUTCD) Connected and Automated Vehicle (CAV) Task Force Meeting, updates on signage and pavement marking uniformity were the main topics of discussion. With CAVs entering U.S. roadways every day, the need for uniformity is growing exponentially. Transformational technologies on CAVs raise new questions for groups like the NCUTCD, such as signage that appears on the exterior of CAVs. For instance, many autonomous vehicles (AVs) manufacturers have their own signage displays on the exterior of the vehicle that alert human drivers and pedestrians of the CAV’s intentions on the roadway.

Big benefits come with Integrated Corridor Management

How transportation departments tackle congestion, delays, and crashes by utilizing roadway capacity

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Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) initiatives are basic plans that connect roadway users, the road, and work zones and allow for effective communication. They are vital to advancing roadway safety and countering common challenges such as congestion, traffic delays, and crashes.

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