High Friction Surfacing

 

Research

Research into the use of High Friction Surfacing (HFS) and issues related to friction demand, testing, management and the benefit of HFS as a safety treatment are included in this section.

 

"What Is and Is Not HFS" PowerPoint Slides

Evaluation of Laboratory Tests to Quantify Frictional Properties of Aggregates. Maryland SHA, MACTEC Engineering and Consulting, Inc. (July 2010)

NCHRP Document 108:P Guide for Pavement Friction; NCHRP Project 01-43 (February 2009)

Friction Measurement Methods and the Correlation Between Road Friction and Traffic Safety - Literature Review (2001)

Laboratory Test on High-Friction Surfaces for Highways, J.C. Nicholls, TRL Report 176

Some U.K. Developments in Skid-Resistant Road Surfaces. Lamb, DR 1977

Trials for High-Friction Surfaces for Highways, J.C. Nicholls

Road Safety - Research, Policing and Education Conference - Using High Friction Surface Treatments to Reduce Traffic Accidents (September 2004)

Incorporating Road Safety Into Pavement Management: Maximizing Surface Friction for Road Safety Improvements. Bill, Andrea; Noyce, David A.; Yambo, Josue (June 2007)

 

The Skid Resistance Behaviour of Thin Surface Course Systems - Final Report PPR564. Roe and Dunford (2008)
Proprietary thin surface course systems have been successfully used on UK trunk roads for over 10 years, providing quiet surfaces while maintaining good friction when the road is wet. However, a significant disadvantage of these materials from cost and sustainability viewpoints is that they use polish-resistant aggregate throughout the surface course rather than as a thin layer of chippings spread on the surface. The surface texture of "thin surfacings" as they are colloquially known, has specific characteristics - often described as "negative texture" - that interact with vehicle tyres in a different way to traditional materials such as hot rolled asphalt (HRA) and surface dressing, which have "positive texture". This different interaction mechanism results in relatively low tyre noise and may also lead to a different polishing action and to different in-service skid resistance.

 

Engineering Safer Road Surfaces to Help Achieve U.S. Highway Safety Goal. Smith and Larson, P.E. (September 2011)
In recent years, there has been a major increase in activities related to improving highway safety in the United States (U.S.). This is emphasized by the publications by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) of the 2008 Guide for Pavement Friction and the 2010 Highway Safety Manual (first edition), by the NCHRP 500-series reports (Guidance for Implementation of the AASHTO Strategic Highway Safety Plan), and by the updated FHWA regulations and guidance regarding the Highway Safety Improvement Program. These and many other recent or ongoing research and technology development activities are beginning to have a positive impact on the nation's crash fatalities; a number that in 2008 dipped below 40,000 for the first time since 1962.

 

Field Performance of High Friction Surfaces - VTRC 10-CR6. Izeppi, Ph.D.; Flintsch, Ph.D.; McGhee, P.E. (June 2010)
This report describes an evaluation of high friction surface (HFS) systems. The goal of this evaluation was to develop guidance for agencies when considering whether an HFS was an appropriate solution when addressing specific instances of low skid resistance and/or especially high friction demand. HFS systems are specially designed thin surface treatments that provide significant additional skid resistance of pavements and bridge decks without significantly affecting other qualities of the surface such as noise, ride quality, or durability. This report documents the location and climatic conditions where some of these systems are placed, recounts the experiences reported by the agencies that were responsible for their placement, and summarizes key HFS service-level indicators (friction and texture).

 

High Friction Surfacing Failure Mechanisms. Waters and Hogan (2011)
This report describes an evaluation of high friction surface (HFS) systems. The goal of this evaluation was to develop guidance for agencies when considering whether an HFS was an appropriate solution when addressing specific instances of low skid resistance and/or especially high friction demand. HFS systems are specially designed thin surface treatments that provide significant additional skid resistance of pavements and bridge decks without significantly affecting other qualities of the surface such as noise, ride quality, or durability. This report documents the location and climatic conditions where some of these systems are placed, recounts the experiences reported by the agencies that were responsible for their placement, and summarizes key HFS service-level indicators (friction and texture).

 

Assessing Curve Severity and Design Consistency Using Energy- and Friction-Based Measures. Pratt and Bonneson.
The increase in side friction demand above drivers' comfort thresholds is shown to be roughly proportional to the kinetic energy reduction associated with speed reduction. Agencies can use these curve severity measures to assist in identifying curves in their jurisdictions that would most likely benefit from safety improvements.

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